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Passionate Digital.

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If you work for a D1 NCAA or professional sports team, you’ve likely got a large and varied collection of journalists following the team’s every move. Which is fantastic. They exist to provide objective, in-depth insight on the team. Fans crave this kind of content. They want to hear about injury rumors from beat reporters and theories about why the team typically slumps in January from talking heads. Unbiased reporting. Wins and losses receive the same treatment. Scandals get just as much or more coverage as charity work. It’s a crucial part of the communications strategy for any team. But…

What if I told you that the President of the United States and an 18th-Century statistician provided some of the most valuable content marketing advice for 2016? Hard to believe? Dig this: Way back in the late 1800s, statistician Francis Galton postulated that most statistically measurable phenomena would regress toward the mean. To those of us in the modern world, we recognize this idea as a bell curve. You see this curve when you graph test scores in a classroom – human height and weight, life expectancy, etc.  He called it “an unsuspected and most beautiful form of regularity.” You probably learned and forgot this…

The “curation” aspect of social content is underrated, but that’s what’s valuable. Not only carefully selecting third-party and user-generated content, but also trimming the fat from your own content ideas. The things you DON’T publish say just as much about you as the things you do. For your brand to be something, it inherently must not be something else. So, the absolute first step in any social strategy has to be answering the question, “who are we?” The answer to this question will guide your strategy and inform your decision making on every step after. The more precisely you answer…

  There’s a dichotomy in social media marketing that doesn’t get talked about a lot. See, your publishing options and opportunities are limited only by your imagination, yet your potential for successful outcomes is constrained by the never ending flood of competitive content all vying for the finite attention of your audience. This truth limits the number of things you can achieve in social to one thing…. Success in social is measured by how well you can sell a simple story that resonates with your audience and the actions your audience takes to amplify that message. Every time you hit publish…

Twitter’s grown up a lot in the last 5 years. From only 54 million users in 2011, to over 300 million now. #SMSports has grown up with it, with each of the last 5 National Championship winners announcing its win on the network to growing communities of fans and attention. While it’s admirable to see Alabama’s consistency in social execution with text only updates in each of its three wins, the engagement numbers clearly favor a more visual element. 2015: That’s it! @AlabamaFTBL wins the 2016 #NationalChampionship #RollTide — Alabama Football (@AlabamaFTBL) January 12, 2016 2014 The Chase: COMPLETE 2014…

The Great Social Gulf: The divide between content that’s thoughtful, beautiful and deep, and content of the instantaneous, short and simple variety is growing. In 2016, we’ll see more content at the extremes of quality and length, and much less in between. Long Form Content: Medium, Facebook Notes, LinkedIn Publishing, 10k character tweets. Micro Content: Twitter’s Vine, Instagram’s Boomerang, GIFs. High Quality: More DSLR’s, fewer iPhones. More copywriters, fewer interns. Lower Quality: “What works on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube likely will not generate the same success on Snapchat.” Voice Shift – It doesn’t matter if you’re “on fleek:” Too…

I recently started a new gig at Callahan Creek, my first agency job; so I was a little anxious about writing my first blogpost for callahancreek.com. Luckily, I remembered some excellent advice from my favorite advisor Mark Twain: “Write what you know.” Well, for the last three years I’ve been working in athletics and social media, building the largest social following in all of NCAA basketball. So that’s what I know. Bear with me; this post is going to be one big sports analogy. Here’s the thing. In sports, most of the attention is paid to a small percentage of…

In July, I made the extremely tough decision to leave Kansas Athletics, where I had served in the role of Strategic Communications Director for three seasons, mostly directing strategy and generating content for social. At some point I’ll probably write more about the how and why, but right now I want to talk about something specific that impacted my choice. Let me explain. After the split with KU I moved on to a new gig at Callahan Creek, and Kansas moved on with a replacement in my role. Nice, nice, very nice. Now, the cool thing about this is that the…

Forgive me for a second while I jump up on my social media soapbox.  GIFs are awesome, and the native integration into Twitter and Facebook have opened up a lot of cool opportunities. But most of you are doing it wrong. There are better uses for this technology than random reactions from movies and TV shows. Content like this is not building your brand. Sure, you’re getting retweets and likes and chuckles from your audience, but the emotional reaction is to the GIF, which has nothing to do with your brand.  It takes a bit of planning, and some knowledge of how…

Don’t get too excited, this post is more simple trick than rocket science strategy, but that doesn’t mean it’s not highly effective. In 2014-15 one of my goals was to increase traffic to kuathletics.com from social. My team and I were already doing social pushes of individual stories from our site, so I needed to come up with a new way to drive traffic. I did this by simply adding a kuathletics.com tag to social media posts that didn’t include a link. Think content meant to engage, posts without a call to action. Content like this: Michael Stigler's time in…